How to Care For Atlantic Sea Nettles

Atlantic Sea Nettles are a beautiful and stunnmaxresdefaulting animal. They can be found in many different colors and patterns. Despite their delicate looks, these jellyfish make an excellent beginner jellyfish for the home aquarium.

They originate from the murky and brackish rivers and sounds of North Carolina and Virginia. Because they find home in rivers, they have strong, but smooth movements in the aquarium. Atlantic Sea Nettles are very different from their other Sea Nettle cousins. For starters, their size is much smaller, reaching a maximum diameter of around 5″. In captivity, this is usually 2-3″.  Their tentacles are quite long, and typically measure 6″-1.5 feet. As you will find out below, their temperature, dietary and salinity requirements are quite different as well.

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Young Atlantic Sea Nettles are clear, and take on the color of whatever they eat. This one is full on brine shrimp!

What do they eat? Atlantic Sea Nettles eat a wide variety of foods. They will happily consume our JellyFuel Dry Jellyfish food, and this makes an excellent staple for them. They will also gladly accept Mysis shrimp as a snack. Most Sea Nettles are “medusavorous” meaning they need to eat other jellyfish to survive. Atlantic Sea Nettles do not require this, meaning they do quite fine on our dry food alone. That being said, they will eat up any other jellyfish placed in their tank. It’s best that they be kept with other members of their species!

What parameters should the water be? Atlantic Sea Nettles should be kept at a salinity of 1.015 – 1.020 (21-27 ppt). Your eyes aren’t mistaken, they really should be kept at such a low salinity! They will do fine at higher or standard salinities, but we recommend keeping them at lower levels. We have yet to find any solid scientific evidence to support this, but it seems that salinity affects the colors and patterns of Atlantic Sea Nettles. In our experience here at the Jellyfish Warehouse Lab, we have found that salinities around 1.020 and higher cause the jellyfish to develop and all white color. Salinities more towards 1.015 may cause the jellyfish to develop stripes, spots, and blotches in red- dark burgundy. A lot of this is also based on genetics, so your sea nettle may still end up white, even if it’s at a lower salinity. Something to keep in mind if you purchase a young Atlantic Sea Nettle from us!

Atlantic Sea Nettles do great at room temperature, and can be kept all the way up to 77 degrees F (68-77°F). These jellies do well in tanks with decently strong flow, as they are stronger swimmers. They also do well in tanks with less flow, for the same reason. You will likely notice your Sea Nettles swimming against the flow. This is quite normal, as the fight the current and tides in their natural habitat. We recommend they be kept in an Orbit 20, Pulse 80, Pulse 160, Eon 2ube or 3on tank. They should be kept only with other Atlantic Sea Nettles, and stocked fairly low. Densely stocked tanks will end up with sea nettles tangling their tentacles together.

Do they sting? 

Atlantic Sea Nettles do have a noticeable sting to them. They typically will cause a tingling sensation, like pins and needles, as well as an itching sensation. This usually subsides in a couple of minutes. Captive bred Atlantic Sea Nettles have a lesser sting, but we still recommend exercising caution when handling these jellyfish.

You can buy your own pet Atlantic Sea Nettle jellyfish and jellyfish aquarium at our online store: Jellyfish Warehouse

Check out our video on Atlantic Sea Nettles!

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